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Oh I don't know...like I actually don't know. I don't know what I'm doing with my life.

Thoughts and rants and pensivity and occasional made up words. And life (what little I know of it) and little things.

Here there be...personal posts, things that make me smile, things that make me laugh, fangirly nonsense, architecture/interior design, beautiful places, beautiful things, cats, owls, and lots of images/text relating to how good I am at procrastination.

(Source: annabelleebypoe, via heathyr)

City Map Illustrations | by Anna Bond of Rifle Paper Co.

Check out these delightful prints of city map illustrations by Anna Bond, co-founder of Rifle Paper Co. I’m a big fan of her work, and I’d gladly add everything on Rifle Paper Co.’s website to my wishlist! Purchase these prints here

(via varsois)

cupofteaorgtfo:

Better get my shit packed for Hogwarts the train leaves tomorrow

(via flyingfromreality)

shslequius:

"homework" *tired zombie noises*

"studying" *sad zombie noises*

"responsibilities" *disgusted zombie noises*

"internet" *happy zombie noises*

(Source: clgdoublelifts, via thats-so-meme)

butfili:

inspired by everyone

(via -wondersmith)

archiemcphee:

British-born, Italy-based sculptor Matthew Simmonds is an art-historian-turned-stone-carver who sculpts beautiful architectural interiors inside rough pieces of marble and stone. His pieces look like miniature classical monuments and temples, empty of people, but full of intricate details.

“To create a sculpture that catches the light and structure of a building and lets the eye wander, to feel that here my eye could live, here a part of me could stay, is a great achievement,“ writes Simmonds. “The sculptures give the viewer a different perspective on space. They look different from every viewpoint. You long to be in them, and they seem almost more meaningful for that.“

To view more of Matthew Simmonds’ intricate sculptures click here.

[via Colossal]

(via thingssheloves)

molotowcocktease:

marcoereus:

I’m so tired of people telling me German is an “ugly, angry” language. When my German teacher tells us jokes it’s the sweetest, happiest language in the world. When I teach my father the word for daughter he smiles, repeating “Tochter” to himself until he gets it right, and in that moment German sounds like pride. There’s nothing angry or ugly about a language that never says goodbye, only “until we meet again.”

Thank you for this

(via slayerofastolat)

captain america a-z: part one

(Source: shieldsexual, via -wondersmith)

10knotes:

catsbeaversandducks: My Adopted Cat Is The Best Climbing Partner Ever

Via Bored Panda

(via thingssheloves)

10 negative thoughts

from a very negative night. i know and i wish i could be strong and positive, but sometimes it just all crumbles.

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peterjbyrne:

Drawing House (I love traditional Japanese architecture, especially the Tea House. Technically, the Tea House is a building that was designed for the single purpose of preparing and drinking tea. Simple. But tea drinking in Japanese culture reached a level of religion. It became a kind of spiritual meditation, part of Zen. Thus the Tea House is in some ways religious architecture. It is interesting to compare the tea house to the medieval cathedral. Both buildings are created to serve a spiritual purpose. The cathedral is a large, towering, overwhelming structure built to impress the visitor with the grandness of God. The interior of a cathedral is meant to elevate the spirit. The tea house, on the other hand, is a small container that offers a personal space for introspection.
It is the idea of a small building designed for personal introspection that inspires the “Drawing House” model. It is a personal piece. While I am not a Zennist and I do not take to drinking tea as a spiritual activity (I do drink tea but not with that purpose), I draw and do think of drawing as a spiritual activity. And that is what the Drawing House is for. It is a structure that offers a variety of spaces and a variety of atmospheres to draw.
The main drawing space is on the first level. It has a built-in table long enough to enable the drawing of scrolls (I draw in a variety of formats). It also has a built-in storage compartment for art supplies and built-in shelves. The atmosphere of the drawing space can be manipulated by the sliding doors located on two of the walls. When fully closed, the doors seal the room, offering privacy and seclusion ideal for introspection. When fully open, a large portion of the corner of the building allows a view to the landscape outside and lets natural light into the interior space.
The secondary drawing space in on the second floor. It also has a built-in long drawing table. The space’s main feature is the sky “door” (how this would work in reality I have not detailed yet). The large sky door opens the ceiling to the heavens. Thus the artist can feel like he is sitting under the clouds with God looking at the artist’s creations.
There are two other drawing spaces in this structure. One is the balcony on the second floor and the other is on the exterior of the building on the deck) 

Maciek Jozefowicz

peterjbyrne:

Drawing House (I love traditional Japanese architecture, especially the Tea House. Technically, the Tea House is a building that was designed for the single purpose of preparing and drinking tea. Simple. But tea drinking in Japanese culture reached a level of religion. It became a kind of spiritual meditation, part of Zen. Thus the Tea House is in some ways religious architecture. It is interesting to compare the tea house to the medieval cathedral. Both buildings are created to serve a spiritual purpose. The cathedral is a large, towering, overwhelming structure built to impress the visitor with the grandness of God. The interior of a cathedral is meant to elevate the spirit. The tea house, on the other hand, is a small container that offers a personal space for introspection.

It is the idea of a small building designed for personal introspection that inspires the “Drawing House” model. It is a personal piece. While I am not a Zennist and I do not take to drinking tea as a spiritual activity (I do drink tea but not with that purpose), I draw and do think of drawing as a spiritual activity. And that is what the Drawing House is for. It is a structure that offers a variety of spaces and a variety of atmospheres to draw.

The main drawing space is on the first level. It has a built-in table long enough to enable the drawing of scrolls (I draw in a variety of formats). It also has a built-in storage compartment for art supplies and built-in shelves. The atmosphere of the drawing space can be manipulated by the sliding doors located on two of the walls. When fully closed, the doors seal the room, offering privacy and seclusion ideal for introspection. When fully open, a large portion of the corner of the building allows a view to the landscape outside and lets natural light into the interior space.

The secondary drawing space in on the second floor. It also has a built-in long drawing table. The space’s main feature is the sky “door” (how this would work in reality I have not detailed yet). The large sky door opens the ceiling to the heavens. Thus the artist can feel like he is sitting under the clouds with God looking at the artist’s creations.

There are two other drawing spaces in this structure. One is the balcony on the second floor and the other is on the exterior of the building on the deck

Maciek Jozefowicz

steve rogers + cards against humanity (insp.)

(Source: buckkybbarnes, via sei-pazzo)

conquerorwurm:

One of my favorite things to see is random people trying to interact with unfamiliar outdoor cats. Just standing there with a hand out, making kissy noises, maybe meowing at the cat while it ignores them. Mankind at its best and least dignified

(via savannalikestextposts)